How to Manage Withdrawal from Alcohol

Anyone getting sober is likely to have to do with the issue of withdrawals from alcohol, whether or not a detox is necessary, and possibly the effects of withdrawal from  narcotics as well.

If someone has been drinking heavily for a while, or to a point where it has become a problem for them, then suddenly stopping is likely to have an impact on them.

Not only their physical body, but on the emotional issues it is likely to start bringing up as well.

The reality is, that withdrawal effects from alcohol can vary significantly from individual to individual, irrespective of the amount they have been drinking beforehand.

What is important is to be aware of the potential dangers of  withdrawal, how they can be managed and how best to prepare for the need for a proper detox.

Rehab

A lot of people will get sober through a rehab or treatment center, and one issue about which rehab to choose is its approach to how to detox someone.

Any rehab should have clinical facilities and staff, or access to such locally, who can assess whether there is a need for a detox, and if so overseas and manage it in a safe and effective manner.

Clinical facilities in terms of staff, location and appropriate medication are a key element of ensuring the safety of an individual once they get sober, and beginning the process of rebuilding their life.

Withdrawal Symptoms

Withdrawal symptoms from alcohol or alcoholism are the body experiencing the withdrawal of something it is used to, which it has become heavily addicted to.

It is almost worth thinking of these symptoms as the body fighting back in the way.

Symptoms can range from nausea, headaches, shakes, sweats etc through to full-blown hallucinations, DT’s etc.

Many medical websites offer a full range of the potential symptoms of withdrawal, as well as a timeline of how this can affect people.

While this can be helpful it is worth remembering that individuals do differ significantly as to how they withdraw from alcoholism, and what is important is to be aware of the potential dangers, and have strategies in place in order to cope with them.

Home Detox

When a person does not go into rehab, and sobers up on their own in any way, the process of managing withdrawal is normally referred to as a home detox.

This does not normally mean that they actually do do any type of formal detox, it normally refers to the process of simply getting through it, albeit in a fairly unpleasant manner.

What is crucially important that someone is getting sober, is at they have access to medical help, and a medical assessment of what they are doing.

This is best done through a primary care physician, but if this is not possible and maybe other help available.

There are a number of websites available that give practical advice about the possible effects of withdrawal from  alcoholism and how to manage it.

Dual Addiction

This is a phrase that is used to describe anyone who is addicted to alcohol and any other drug or narcotic.

A significant number of alcoholics also use drugs and pills, prescribed and non-prescribed, and this can also be a significant issue in stopping using them.

There are significant potential dangers when stopping using any type of narcotic, and these potential dangers can be multiplied significantly when the person has been using alcohol as well.

If someone is entering rehab, it is essential that completely honest about what drugs they have been using, how much and or how long.

This can be very tricky, as someone who is an active alcoholic will almost invariably  minimise the amount they have been drinking and using.

If someone is getting sober on their own, even if they are using some type of therapy or 12 step based program to help them, it is essential to get some type of medical help as well.

This medical help can be in terms of assessing the need for a detox, and how that can best be managed. It is really important that this process is looked at as soon as a decision is made to stop drinking or using.


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