SOBER

ALCOHOL WITHDRAWAL ADDICTION

Anyone entering a rehab for a problem with alcohol, commonly referred to as alcoholism or alcohol addiction would be well advised to be aware of the potential effects of alcohol withdrawal, sometimes referred to as a detox, historically referred to as the DT’s.

The effects of withdrawal from alcohol addiction or alcoholism can be severe in some people, and it is a good idea to make sure that anyone entering a rehab is clinically assessed,  by experienced clinical staff to  monitor the effects of withdrawal from alcohol.

One important aspect of alcoholism that is often not fully understood is that it is regarded commonly as what is termed a progressive illness.

There are sometimes a debate about whether alcoholism is a disease or an illness or a combination of nature or nurture, and people will have differing views on this question.

Too many  people who have got sober using Alcoholics Anonymous, they are very aware that her own alcoholism is a progressive illness, and for many it is the progressive element that is really important.

ALCOHOL WITHDRAWAL ADDICTION

The progression of alcoholism in many people is not simply a issue of tolerance for alcohol, it is a description of both how their drinking has progressed over a period of time, how that emotional state has changed during that time, and how alcohol has become at the end of the drinking the only thing of real value, the only thing that needs to be protected and kept safe.

One of the reasons this is so important, is in terms of understanding the nature of alcoholism, and in truth the only people who probably really do understand it either active alcoholics themselves, or people who have got sober and would consider themselves to be alcoholics in recovery.

The nature of alcoholism as an illness can be quite varied and widespread, the progression of it is an element that people who are alcoholics will at some level be able to identify with, either in terms of the  tolerance or lack of tolerance of their drinking, or a more general felt sense of their inner and outer world closing in on them, and alcohol remaining the only thing that is holding them together.

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EARLY REFERRAL and OPIOD ADDICTION

‘When Gov. Dannel P. Malloy last year signed into law a comprehensive bill targeting opioid addiction, many touted it as one of the toughest in the nation, often pointing to the seven-day cap on opioid prescriptions and new prescription monitoring requirements as reasons why.

But a lesser known aspect of the law is one that fosters a new relationship between primary care providers and licensed alcohol and drug counselors, or LADCs.

In essence, the law encourages primary care providers to keep an eye out for signs their patients may be becoming dependent on opioids.

An example, according to Connecticut Association for Addiction Professionals President Susan Campion, is a patient who, not long after coming in with one injury, quickly returns with another.

If the provider suspects an addiction is developing, he or she can refer the patient to an LADC, who will follow steps outlined in Section 6 of the law by gleaning information about the person’s family and personal history of addiction and determining how likely he or she is to abuse drugs prescribed for pain.’

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REVIEW of SOBERLINK SYSTEM

‘Soberlink, the leader in mobile breath alcohol detection technology, announced today its inclusion in an expert panel consensus paper about the use of remote monitoring in the clinical treatment of alcohol use disorder.

The consensus paper – written by a panel of nine alcohol use disorder treatment and research experts – was recently published in the Journal of Addiction Medicine.

The paper examines the Soberlink System as a method of BAC collection and monitoring in various recovery situations.

The experts concluded that remote monitoring could play a vital role in successful recovery as a method of deterrent, and a means of early detection and intervention.’

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Story of a Dry Drunk ………

‘According to statistics, almost one in six women like me have alcohol five or more times a week – and more than half (including me) exceed their safe daily limit on at least one occasion. I’ve been observing not only my own drinking habits as well as that of my friends for many years now.

Sometimes (often) we drink alone and sometimes (often) we don’t eat much with it because we are, after all, middle class, professional women who know the caloric value of every thimble.

Truth be told many of us were borderline or closet anorexics or bulimics in our youth and this is our “transdiagnosis” in full throw.  In other words, as perfectionistic, anxious striving teenagers, we didn’t eat at all or we ate too much and purged.’

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Toronto Agnostics and Human Rights ………

‘On January 18, 2017, representatives of the Greater Toronto Area Intergroup, Knight and A.A. World Services Inc. and the General Services Board of Alcoholic Anonymous Inc. met to formally resolve Knight’s human rights claim.

Lawrence Knight is ecstatic. “This is huge.  There can be no doubts for A.A. chapters around the world – a desire to be sober really is the only requirement.”

Knight and GTA Intergroup agree that it is not A.A.’s practice to exclude anyone, including A.A. groups, based on creed:  “All groups, regardless of their belief system form part of the A.A fellowship.

The only requirement for A.A. membership is a desire to stop drinking and any two or more people who come together for the purpose of being sober may call themselves an A.A. group, as long as they have a desire to be sober, and provided they have no outside affiliation”. ‘

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SUPER SOBER BOWL ………..

‘Saratoga Springs — Staff at Saratoga Stadium in Saratoga Springs expect huge crowds at the sports bar for Super Bowl Sunday.

“There’s a lot more food ordering a lot more beer and alcohol,” said Saratoga Stadium Manager Lisa Vigliotti. “So just making sure we’re ready stocked and ready to go,” she said.

Alcohol at a Super Bowl event or party can be a problem for recovering alcoholics.

Brian Farr, who is the chairperson of Recovery Advocacy in Saratoga, or RAIS, has a solution.

“We came up with the idea of the Super Bowl last year when we decided that we would like to do something on the Super Bowl that doesn’t involve drinking,” Farr said.’

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